2017 Optometry Student Challenge Winners

2017 Optometry Student Challenge Winners

Congratulations to the winners of the 2017 Optometry Student Challenge

More than 65 optometry students submitted abstracts focusing on study projects or student-based case histories related to contact lenses for the chance to win a travel stipend of $1,500 to attend the symposium and convert their abstracts into scientific posters. The challenge was open to students in their third and fourth years of study. Abstracts were judged on academic merit by a panel of industry experts.

The lead authors of the top five posters were:

OSC Winners 2017

Theodore Chow, Indiana University School of Optometry
Chow, a third-year student and president of his university's American Academy of Optometry student chapter, focused on scleral topography to map and compare toricity between keratoconic and normal individuals.

Scleral Profiles of Keratoconic vs. Normal Eyes: Determining the Importance of Scleral Toricity in Fitting Scleral Lenses








OSC Winners 2017

Gabriella Courey, University of Montreal School of Optometry
Courey, a third-year student and Quebec liaison for the Contact Lens and Cornea Section of the American Optometric Association, covered the topic of treating ocular graft versus host disease with scleral lenses in a pediatric patient.

Treating ocular graft versus host disease with scleral lenses in a pediatric patient





OSC Winners 2017

Yuno Iwabuchi, Pacific University
Iwabuchi, a fourth-year student, presented a pilot study on the use of hybrid contact lenses for daily wear orthokeratology.

Hybrid Contact Lenses for Daily Wear Orthokeratology







OSC Winners 2017

Kiri Rutledge, Northeastern State University Oklahoma College of Optometry
Rutledge, a fourth-year student and president of her college's Beta Sigma Kappa Honor Society, covered corneal vault and higher-order aberrations in scleral contact lenses.

Corneal Vault and Higher Order Aberrations in Scleral Contact Lenses








OSC Winners 2017

Stephanie Sonnenburg, Illinois College of Optometry
Sonnenburg, a fourth-year student and member of the private practice club and contact lens society at her college, presented on gas permeable lenses in the elderly population after corneal transplants.

Intralimbal Lens Design for an Elderly Patient with Extensive Corneal Scarring





Honorable mentions were given to Candice Moore and Ashley Noble, both students at Nova Southeastern University, and Stephanie Tran, a student at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry.